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Until 2014, Tri-Valley Conservancy focused a lot of attention on promoting the agriculture that’s at the heart of our community. Now, we’re excited to include work with wildlife habitats. In the Fall of 2014, Tri-Valley Conservancy received approval by California Department of Fish and Wildlife to hold habitat easements in order to provide threatened species and other wildlife with the protected resources and habitat management they need to survive.

The San Francisco Bay Area is a critical biodiversity hotspot, which means there are more plant and wildlife species threatened by habitat loss right here in the Bay Area than just about anywhere else in the country. There are more plant and animal species that need your help than nearly the entire United States. And you’re right in the crossroads.

No, not just the 580, 680 and 84 highway crossroads. The Tri-Valley is a major crossroads for wildlife from different habitats. Here in the East Bay, the coastal, mountain and desert species co-mingle for habitat, food, travel or finding that special someone to continue the species with. In fact, one of the largest nesting populations of golden eagles, a federally protected species, is right here in the Tri-Valley.

Threatened burrowing owls and San Joquin kit fox, the smallest fox on the continent pictured above, are also native to the Tri-Valley area. American badgers and Tulle elk which used to make their home in the Tri-Valley are beginning to make a comeback thanks to open space protection and habitat management. Through continued land protection and habitat management, the San Joaquin kit fox and other threatened and displaced wildlife like will make a comeback here too.

With the help of supporters like you this will always be an amazing place to live, for you, wildlife and future generations.

You can read more about Fish and Wildlife Habitat Easements here. You can read more about how we defend wildlife habitat like we did in Doolan Canyon or how we restore wildlife habitat like we do at Cattail Pond.